Monthly Archives: December 2012

Status Report

It seems like a lifetime ago, cialis 40mg ampoule but I was married for 9 years. Obviously, it ended in divorce, so keep that in mind while reading the list below. But, hopefully, you can learn from some of my mistakes. If you have any lessons to add, please add them in the comments. We’d love to hear them. In no particular order, here are 9 lessons from a failed marriage:

  1. Connect daily. My first marriage died of atrophy. I can’t speak for my ex, but I remember desperately looking for time for me. Between, work, kids, and home repairs, it was really hard to find time to write songs, hang out with my brothers, or play the occasional video game. By about the end of marriage year 3 is when I think I lost my focus. I spent more effort on time for me, than finding a healthy balance. Looking back, I think it was a defense mechanism. I was tired of being hurt– my ex didn’t wan’t to go out because she was worried about spending the money, and over time, that starts to hurt. It’s probably worth spending a few dollars on a sitter, packing a meal, and going to a park. Connecting doesn’t have to mean going out (although, that’s important, too). Connecting means a touch on the shoulder. A kiss for no reason. A compliment. Asking questions. A conversation that doesn’t involve kids or work. Connecting doesn’t mean talking about logistics. Logistics is something even (some of) the most dysfunctional exes can discuss. Find a way to really connect with your spouse/significant other every single day.
  2. It’s ok to fight (but do it respectfully). It’s a good thing to be passionate. It’s ok to be angry, hurt, sad, really pissed off, whatever. It’s good to express those feelings. It’s always ok to make “I” statements: “I was/felt sad, angry when you said/did [fill in the blank].” Screaming, hurtling insults, sulking? Not so much.
  3. Learn how to apologize the right way. “I’m sorry you felt Read More…

9 lessons from a failed marriage

Because it’s that time of year…

Leave a comment (that’s it) and one of you will win my latest thrifting score. A Sak purse, dosage absolutely perfect for that holiday party!

And a new leaf necklace.

PS. I have plenty of pieces and parts in. Order now (before Sunday 12/16) and I can get them to your before Christmas! I make them myself, ailment you know. I’m your little formerly single mama, happily and incredibly blended mama elf.

xoxo

Alaina

 
It seems like a lifetime ago, mind but I was married for 9 years. Obviously, for sale it ended in divorce, side effects so keep that in mind while reading the list below. But, hopefully, you can learn from some of my mistakes. If you have any lessons to add, please add them in the comments. We’d love to hear them. In no particular order, here are 9 lessons from a failed marriage:

  1. Connect daily. My first marriage died of atrophy. I can’t speak for my ex, but I remember desperately looking for time for me. Between, work, kids, and home repairs, it was really hard to find time to write songs, hang out with my brothers, or play the occasional video game. By about the end of marriage year 3 is when I think I lost my focus. I spent more effort on time for me, than finding a healthy balance. Looking back, I think it was a defense mechanism. I was tired of being hurt– my ex didn’t wan’t to go out because she was worried about spending the money, and over time, that starts to hurt. It’s probably worth spending a few dollars on a sitter, packing a meal, and going to a park. Connecting doesn’t have to mean going out (although, that’s important, too). Connecting means a touch on the shoulder. A kiss for no reason. A compliment. Asking questions. A conversation that doesn’t involve kids or work. Connecting doesn’t mean talking about logistics. Logistics is something even (some of) the most dysfunctional exes can discuss. Find a way to really connect with your spouse/significant other every single day.
  2. It’s ok to fight (but do it respectfully). It’s a good thing to be passionate. It’s ok to be angry, hurt, sad, really pissed off, whatever. It’s good to express those feelings. It’s always ok to make “I” statements: “I was/felt sad, angry when you said/did [fill in the blank].” Screaming, hurtling insults, sulking? Not so much.
  3. Learn how to apologize the right way. “I’m sorry you felt Read More…

In the spirit… holiday giveaway.

Because it’s that time of year…

Leave a comment (that’s it) and one of you will win my latest thrifting score. A Sak purse, information pills absolutely perfect for that holiday party!

And a new leaf necklace.

PS. I have plenty of pieces and parts in. Order now (before Sunday 12/16) and I can get them to your before Christmas! I make them myself, sales you know. I’m your little formerly single mama, happily and incredibly blended mama elf.

xoxo,

Alaina

 

Step-brothers or brothers?

Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, discount he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, what is ed enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to the trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

My sweet older sister Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, prescription he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to the trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

My sweet older sister Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, help he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to the trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

My sweet older sister Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, illness he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, discount enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, there then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to the trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

My sweet older sister Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, salve he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to the trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

My sweet older sister Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, stuff he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, decease enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, patient then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to the trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

My sweet older sister Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, approved he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to that trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. But Seth does not.

When I asked him “why a close up of the trash can?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh, of course, a meme.” For those of you who may be living

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, viagra he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, thumb enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, pharmacy then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to the trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

My sweet older sister Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, illness he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, advice enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, sick then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to that trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. And so does Seth.

When I asked him “why the trash can picture? And a close up?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh. A meme. Clearly.”

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
Seth and I drove to Iowa City this week to celebrate with my little brother who just earned his PhD (in biophysics).

He was pretty excited.

He and his team’s research over the past several years has literally changed the way clinicians test for genetic hearing loss. Pretty incredible and hard to believe he was running around in diapers (last I checked).

But now, look he’s all grown up and busy changing the world. They are even writing about him in Japan.

Seth had fun, viagra 100mg enjoying the scenery.

Including a trash can across the street. It caught his eye, then he–quite dramatically–dashed off to take a picture.

Watch the girl behind him. She’s fascinated.

And still fascinated.

Still looking.

I mean – seriously – what happened to that trash can? And then, finally,

she moves on with her day. But Seth does not.

When I asked him “why a close up of the trash can?” He says,”So, I can make a meme!”

“Oh, of course, a meme.” For those of you who may be living in the Internet Dark Ages, a meme is a photograph with an added caption shared around the Internet. Apparently there is a series of memes making cracks at items, animals or people who appear to be intoxicated.

A few hours later–this surfaced on his Instagram account:

My two sisters, Alyssa and Anna, also made the trek to balmy Iowa City.

(Did I mention it’s so cold there they put sweaters on their trees?)

Alyssa hid from my camera the entire time. I can’t blame her. I’m like the paparazzi. But Anna did not.

Fortunately, for the rest of you, because you get to see a beautiful girl on the Internet.

Twice.

Seth (almost) got a picture of both of us together (my eyes are shut), but he tried his best.

After we had a victory PhD dinner for my brother, we turned around the next morning and drove all the way back to Ohio. But, first we dropped Anna off so she could catch a train to Chicago.

She had to wait two hours for her train, but we left her–in a hurry to get home and back to the kids.

On the car ride home I started reading The Way of Boys. A fantastic book my single mama friend Elizabeth recommended. The author, a behavioral therapist, challenges society’s recent jump to medicate boys if they step out of line at school and at home. Instead, he says behavioral coaching can typically turn around ADHD symptoms in most boys and that most are medicated too early, before other options have been exhausted.

We have experienced this now on several occasions. Therapists actually diagnose Benjamin without even having a conversation with him. It’s crazy!

I am not opposed to ADHD medication, but I am not okay with doing it before we have exhausted all other options (namely, allowing him to mature at his own pace without forcing him to fit into a system designed for girls). We have also found that his relationship with his step-brother, an older boy in his father’s home, has aggravated his behavior. All kinds of fun stuff to deal with over here. But, I can’t imagine doing it without Seth and the kids.

We’re all in it together. That and also knowing my family is there to call, to reach out to, makes a world of a difference.

xoxo,

Alaina

P.S.

The sky crossing the Mississippi River.

 
We aren’t fans of the posed family portrait holiday cards. So, information pills we were pretty excited when my brother made a video of Benjamin doing Gangnam Style on JibJab, pharm

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Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!

which led us to discover their hilarious holiday cards.

Enjoy.

Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!

We aren’t fans of the posed family portrait holiday cards. So, drugs we were pretty excited when my brother made a video of Benjamin doing Gangnam Style

 

I found Jib Jab’s holiday e-cards.

Enjoy.

visit this site 0,40,0″>

Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!

We aren’t fans of the posed family portrait holiday cards. So, about it we were pretty excited when my brother made a video of Benjamin doing Gangnam Style on JibJab, there

cost 0,40,0″>

Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!

which led us to discover their hilarious holiday cards.

Enjoy.

Personalize funny videos and birthday eCards at JibJab!

It’s hard to tell anymore.

They love each other like brothers and they fight like brothers.

This bout in the thrift store ended with Cohen throwing punches at Benjamin and me shouting from the register for them to “cut it out!” That’s what happens when you’re two months apart, viagra the same size and when you know exactly how to set each other off.

Seth spent an entire day, link today – a Saturday – out at a concealed carry class. And after one day straight with them, information pills alone, I feel completely exhausted and drained of any will to live. I would rather be in the office working any day. Call me a rotten mom or an evil step-mother, but I could never, ever be a stay at home mom (or dad) and I commend all of you who are.

A few things to share:

1. Our Holiday card to all of you. Smiles guaranteed.
2. And, a fantastic behavior app for kids called Beep Boop. Give the kids a beep or a boop, tally them up at the end of the day – reward accordingly. Seth and I’s apps are completely synced so we don’t have to add the points in our head and share later. Love it and highly recommend to all of you mamas out there, who may – like me – be a tad exhausted.

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